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This Is Auburn Auburn University Libraries LibGuides

Grant Funding and Proposal Development: Welcome

How the Libraries and Proposal Services and Faculty Support (PSFS) can help you identify and apply for external funding opportunities.

Librarian

Aaron Trehub's picture
Aaron Trehub
Contact:
231 Mell Street
RBD Library
Auburn, AL 36849
334-844-1707
Website

Research Administrator

Susan Elkins's picture
Susan Elkins
Contact:
182 S College St
Samford Hall
Auburn, AL 36849
334-844-7910
Website

Finding Funding Opportunities

Finding Funding Opportunities

The first step in getting funding is finding the right opportunity. Auburn University subscribes to a number of online resources that can help you find funding opportunities in your field. The best starting point is PIVOT, a comprehensive database of over 25,000 federal and private funding opportunities, updated daily. Talk with your subject librarian about setting up a personalized PIVOT search profile.

Finding Research Partners

Finding Research Partners

In addition to helping you use PIVOT, your subject librarian can do custom literature searches in your field to form a complete picture of what's going on and what the research trends are. Publication patterns are another way to surface hot research ideas and potential research partners--at Auburn, at other colleges and universities in the U.S., or overseas. They can also help you avoid wasting time on played-out or marginal areas.

Literature Reviews and Shaping the Proposal Narrative

Literature Reviews and Shaping the Proposal Narrative

The narrative is the most important part of your grant proposal. Again, our subject librarians can help with the prep work by doing literature reviews in your field of interest to identify research trends, research questions, and potential research partners. Working with our colleagues in PSFS, our librarians can also help you to produce a narrative that is clear, impactful, easy to read, and accessible to stakeholders and decision-makers who may not be experts in your field. Contact your subject librarian early in the drafting process to ensure that you have plenty of time to produce a well-crafted, quality proposal.

Writing a Compelling Broader Impacts/Intellectual Merit Statement

Writing a Compelling Broader Impacts/Intellectual Merit Statement

If the narrative is the most important part of your proposal, the broader impacts/intellectual merit statement is the most important part of the narrative. Why is your idea important? What is its larger significance? What will it achieve? How will it influence your and other fields? Most importantly, how will it impact society for the better? Again, our subject librarians can help you answer these questions and put your research proposal in a broader interdisciplinary context, thereby increasing your chances of success. Because our subject librarians are used to working together and sharing information as a matter of course, they can also help to surface possible research connections and directions with other fields.

Crafting a Data Management Plan (DMP)

Crafting a Data Management Plan (DMP)

Most federal funding agencies and many private foundations require a Data Management Plan (DMP) as a part of every funding proposal. We can help you turn your DMP from a routine attachment into an eye-catching asset that helps your proposal stand out from the others. The first step is to contact our Research Data Management Librarian for an individual consultation.

Adding Visual Elements to Your Proposal

Adding Visual Elements to Your Proposal

Graphs, figures, illustrations, and other visual elements can convey information more efficiently than long textual descriptions. Adding visual elements can increase you proposal's impact and make it stand out from the group. Our Information & Research Commons (I&RC) is staffed by media design specialists who can point you to the right tools and show you how to use them.

Other Research Intelligence Services

Other Research Intelligence Services

"Research Intelligence" means using the full array of research information resources and techniques to help researchers navigate the funding landscape and craft successful proposals. Part of this work is raising your research profile and making yourself more visible to colleagues who may be looking for research partners for themselves--or to program officers at funding agencies who are looking for members of blue-ribbon working groups to identify new research agendas.

Subject librarians and research administrators at Auburn have access to a number of research intelligence resources, including:

  • Academic Analytics: a suite of research intelligence databases that help researchers and administrators see and analyze research activity at their and other institutions. Among other things, Academic Analytics can be used to identify promising funding opportunities and potential research collaborators.
  • ORCID (Open Researcher & Contributor ID): a non-profit registry of permanent researcher identifiers and their research products. Having an ORCID ID helps to make your work more visible--and ensures that it will be correctly attributed to you!
  • NCBI/SciENcv (Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae): an electronic system that helps researchers assemble the professional information needed for participation in federally funded research. SciENcv gathers and compiles information on expertise, employment, education and professional accomplishments. Researchers can use SciENcv to create and maintain biosketches that are submitted with grant applications and annual reports. SciENcv allows researchers to describe and highlight their scientific contributions in their own words.

Contact us at researchsupport@auburn.edu to take advantage of these and other research intelligence resources.